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Archive for August 7th, 2008

OSU GeoClub in Death Valley, Part II

Posted by The College of Science at OSU on August 7, 2008

Today we’re sharing the final photos from the Geosciences Club’s Death Valley trip. Thanks to Barry Walker for providing the photo descriptions in both posts.

Mosaic Canyon. The river (apparently very ephemeral) has plastered layers of breccia onto the sides of this canyon, creating an amazing effect.

Barry Walker and Morgan Salisbury in front of Ubehebe Crater, a ~600 ft deep explosion crater in the northern part of the park. A few thousand years ago (estimates differ from 6,000 to 2,000), magma reached the near surface here, boiling the ground water and, as a result, creating several explosion pits, of which Ubehebe Crater is the largest.

Barry Walker and Morgan Salisbury in front of Ubehebe Crater, a ~600 ft deep explosion crater in the northern part of the park. A few thousand years ago (estimates differ from 6,000 to 2,000), magma reached the near surface here, boiling the ground water and, as a result, creating several explosion pits, of which Ubehebe Crater is the largest.

Minor copper mineralization in these hills has caused the distinct coloration of Artists Palette.

Minor copper mineralization in these hills has caused the distinct coloration of Artist's Palette.

Kilns (built originally in 1867, restored in 1971) used to slow-burn wood down to charcoal. The charcoal was then used for smelting and ore extraction in the many mines of Death Valley.

Kilns (built originally in 1867, restored in 1971) used to slow-burn wood down to charcoal. The charcoal was then used for smelting and ore extraction in the many mines of Death Valley.

Sara Alsbury and Lauren Foiles use the ol teamwork method for rock identification.

Sara Alsbury and Lauren Foiles use the ol' "teamwork" method for rock identification.

On the last day, the group hiked partially up Telescope Peak, which is the mountain just to the west of Death Valley and Badwater Basin.

On the last day, the group hiked partially up Telescope Peak, which is the mountain just to the west of Death Valley and Badwater Basin.

Geologists Barry Walker, Russell Rosenberg, Luc Farmer and Lauren Foiles. This is possibly a staged photograph.

Geologists Barry Walker, Russell Rosenberg, Luc Farmer and Lauren Foiles. This is possibly a staged photograph.

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