Breakthroughs

Experience. Explore. Discover. Achieve. And Now: Steward.

  • Welcome to Breakthroughs

    Hello! Welcome to Breakthroughs, a site devoted to sharing with you the latest, greatest advancements from the College of Science at Oregon State University. From breakthroughs in research to transformational philanthropy to interesting tidbits from the daily life of the College, we'll post frequently to keep you up-to-date. Please visit often and absolutely let us know what you might like to learn more about. Enjoy, and of course, GO BEAVS!
  • Subscribe

  • Archives

  • blog stats
  • Top Posts

Vince!

Posted by The College of Science at OSU on August 20, 2008

Vince We’d like to introduce you to Dr. Vince Remcho. He’s our new Associate Dean in the College of Science–everyone is so glad he succumbed to the wooing of his colleagues and has taken on this new role.

He’ll continue to stay busy as a Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science in our Chemistry Department. (He also holds adjunct appointments in Biochemistry & Biophysics and Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering.)

In all of his free time, Vince is an avid bike commuter. Standard apple-tree kind of thing: his kids have not missed A SINGLE day of bike commuting to school in four years. Not one.

We at Breakthroughs are happy, happy about Vince and we hope you will be, too. Stay tuned for more about (and perhaps from, hint, Vince?) in the future.

Here’s a photo of Vince in his lab. We asked him what he’s up to there… we’ll just quote him because it sounds more natural coming from him:

I am holding a “master”, designed and produced by Myra Koesdjojo (a senior Ph.D. candidate in my group), used for replica molding of a microfluidic or “lab-on-a-chip” device. The master is made using silicon wafer fab technology and consists of a polished silicon wafer onto which a photoresist is spin-coated. The photoresist is then patterned using the piece of equipment I am standing in front of, an IMP SF-100 direct write photolithography system. We then use a thermopneumatic press to transfer the features from the master into plastics such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), and layer-p to generate complex 3-D fluidic networks. The finished devices are used for multi-step biochemical and environmental analyses and can also be applied to chemical labeling and synthesis operations.

Vince also wanted us to know that the real story in the lab is driven by the students and proudly shared this group photo. Myra Koesdjojo, mentioned above, is third from the left:

Advertisements

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: